Tiny Homes, Big Impact

Tiny Homes, Big Impact

Ecosystems are upheld by each and every part of the whole, even one small shift shakes the entire system. The endangered Indiana bat provides insect control, pollination, and spreads seeds for increased plant growth. In fact, the US Forest Service values bats overall at $23-54 billion annually for the US agriculture market due to pest control and fertilization. The Indiana bat became endangered due to cave disruption and the harvesting of shagbark hickory trees, their favorite summer habitat. 
Traditionally, shagbark hickory wood is very hard, perfect for ax handles, baseball bats, and durable furniture. The fragrant smoke from the wood also flavors meat and its nuts are the perfect food for small animals and humans alike. Due to the trees' many uses, they are often cut down, leaving the Indiana bat without a summer roost. 
As managers of 7,000 acres of forest in Southern Indiana, OFS helps preserve shagbark hickory trees—and the Indiana bat with them. Bats prefer trees with larger diameters, and as hickories are slow growing, it is especially important to preserve, protect, and cultivate these trees in our local forests. 
Providing for bat populations not only helps out the US Agriculture industry but helps our land and our ecosystem. Better insect control leads to increased plant life, feeding small animals, who then continue to fertilize plants and bury seeds. This is one way that we support the local ecosystem that supports us. How can you support your local ecosystem?
 
Apr 23, 2018 NEWS/